Priority registration creates a ‘one percent’

At the beginning of every semester Riverside City College students are challenged with some type of registration loophole or maddening new policy change.

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By Staff Editorial

Stressful registration (Allison Perez / Photo Editor)

By Staff Editorial

At the beginning of every semester Riverside City College students are challenged with some type of registration loophole or maddening new policy change. This semester students found themselves locked out of classes or dropped from rosters because of unpaid fees.

As ever increasing class cuts make it harder for students to get the classes they need, it’s time to take a look at the registration system and whether it’s really benefitting the entire student body.

Some students are unaware that RCC offers priority registration; priority registration is a process that is established by the Education Code and local board policies of the Riverside Community College District.

This gives certain students and campus organizations access to resources and first pick of classes long before class rosters fill up.

It’s like having a Fastpass at Disneyland; everyone wants to get in but without it you’re stuck in the stand-by line.

Programs such as Community Active Progress, Disabled Students Support Program, Extended Opportunities Programs & Services, and Veterans Resource Center offer applications in their offices at all three RCCD campuses, if students feel they’re eligible.

Associated Students of RCC, senate members and athletes also receive priority registration.

While students who have served their country or have disabilities certainly qualify for extra support, it’s hard to understand why students who willingly volunteer for extra-curricular activities get priority registration.

It’s no secret that there are already perks that go along with being a student athlete or a member of student government.

There are plenty of students who are involved in RCC clubs and activities who don’t receive priority registration.

They understand that their involvement in outside functions requires sacrifices. It is a choice that each student makes when they join a club or group.

With space in certain general education classes like math, science and English at a premium, it seems unfair that regular every day students aren’t given a fighting chance a getting into those classes.

When a wait-listed student walks into class, they are immediately up against students who were able to register early enough to ensure their spot in the class.

It’s hard to get a good position when everyone is fighting for an available spot, especially if it’s in a class that everyone needs, such as biology or math.

Each student is given a date and time to register; students with more units have first choice after all the students in programs are allowed their priority.

It seems returning students who have spent time here and done everything they needed to reach their degree, or transfer requirements, they above everyone should be allowed priority registration; these students are less likely to drop classes like students who take classes for reasons like staying on their parent’s insurance, or getting free money.

While priority registration is necessary for some, for others it’s providing an unfair advantage.

Academically speaking, times are tough right now, and they don’t show any signs of improving.

The least RCC can do is give all students a fair chance at completing their educational goals in timely and efficient manner.

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