Opinion: Not everyone is ready for college and that’s not OK

By Mia Magana

When thinking of college do you think liberation, responsibility, adventure or anxiety? 

Do we really take the time to think about the kind of skills we should have to be prepared?

It’s OK to be scared, nervous and unsure of the next step in life.  

The reality is that not all college bound students are ready for this big step due to a lack of basic knowledge needed to transition into adulthood. 

The norm is that, “Less than half of high school students across the country feel they are ready for college and careers, even though these remain top goals for students,” said Ferman Leal, college and readiness reporter for EdSource.

Having expectations for the future is the bread and butter of being a high school student. 

Some high schools prepare their students for college style classes, study habits and financial aid programs. Other high school students are not so lucky in receiving assistance.

The main concern that isn’t addressed is if students truly understand the process of college. 

How many students understand the process of juggling classes while holding down a part time or full time job? Do colleges really do a good job of informing students which classes benefit their degree of choice? 

 Now how many of those schools teach their students to write checks, pay bills, have an understanding of a car payment, taxes and chores? 

When I think about becoming an adult I don’t think some people take the time to apply the responsibilities that come along with being an adult.     

Sometimes when it is time for a major step in life, some have to make that move to stand on their own and do their best to gather the knowledge they require for their life. 

For example, when I was in high school I thought college was going to be as easy. When I arrived at Riverside City College I was scared out of my mind because I didn’t really realize how far out of my comfort zone I had to be. I was going to have to take initiative towards finding out information.

When thinking of living on our own do we realize what goes into the moving process, especially when moving on campus? When thinking of buying your first car, do you realize what credit level you need to have before buying? These are some of the questions I feel we forget to ask ourselves as we progress into adulthood. 

How can someone not know how to cook their mom’s famous dish? Believe it or not, many students don’t know how to cook and turn to unhealthy food such as fast food or easy to do microwavable dishes.  

While the blame could be put to people being lazy, bad parenting is also to blame. Growing up people are told that they need to do certain tasks in a specific manner but it turns out that there are a multiple amount of ways for things to get done. 

One does not realize the damage parents inflict in pampering their children. There is little to no room for students to learn and gain experience if parents continue to coddle them. 

Those who are really ready possess the critical thinking, communication, social and emotional skills, as well as the ability to be self-directed learners to achieve success. These people are independent and have the confidence to go after what they want.

Some students stress because they are too afraid to ask questions on what they don’t understand. 

The worst case scenario is for someone to have no answer or having to go to a different source. The more experience you gain in asking questions the better you’ll be at being independent and in being assertive.

The Internet has been a thing for quite some time. You have the ability to ask any question and receive and answer. Ask Google anything you have that you’re too afraid to ask. The answer to your questions is only a click away.