‘Losers’ gets an A for average

Imagine a contestant on “American Idol” ready to belt out their final big note, but instead of a show-stopping moment, they miss the mark completely and the room is left feeling awkward and full of pity. That’s what the theater felt like when the end credits rolled on “The Losers.”

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By Stephanie Holland / Editor in Chief

By Stephanie Holland / Editor in Chief

Imagine a contestant on “American Idol” ready to belt out their final big note, but instead of a show-stopping moment, they miss the mark completely and the room is left feeling awkward and full of pity. That’s what the theater felt like when the end credits rolled on “The Losers.”

Based on the comic book by Andy Diggle, “The Losers” follows a team of special ops soldiers who were double crossed and left for dead as they attempt to seek revenge from the mysterious Max.

If this premise sounds like the plot to the upcoming “A-Team” movie, it’s apparently just a coincidence. Of course, that hasn’t stopped constant comparisons. It even led to Warner Bros. changing the film’s release date in order to avoid cluttering the marketplace.

However, it’s not competition from a more anticipated film that sinks “The Losers” it’s the averageness of the film which makes it forgettable. It’s a very generic action movie that features a requisite amount of explosions and gun battles but lacks anything below the surface.

While the cast does have fantastic chemistry, it’s never a good sign when the audience is thinking about the cast’s upcoming films more than the one currently playing.

Jeffrey Dean Morgan (“Watchmen”) plays Clay, the team leader who is wracked with guilt over the team’s predicament. He soon finds their fortunes turning when he is approached by the mysterious and volatile Aisha, portrayed by “Avatar” star Zoe Saldana.

Their first meeting culminates in a sexy and fierce fighting scene early in the film which gives the audience hope for an out of the box action movie.

Unfortunately, that is the last ground breaking scene in the movie, as every other alleged surprise twist is neither a surprise nor a twist.

Idris Elba plays the gruff, uncompromising Roque and while Elba is a talented actor, he is woefully miscast in this part.

The movie’s only saving grace is Chris Evans and Columbus Short as Jensen and Pooch. Their comedic talents livened up an otherwise dull moviegoing experience.

Evans was recently announced as the new Captain America and anyone who doubts his casting will be reformed by his performance here.

Jason Patric portrays Max like a Bond villain in training, walking a fine line between caricature and over the top mess.

The disappointment in this film begins with the script, which was written by Peter Berg (“Hancock”) and James Vanderbilt (“The Rundown”). Berg has directed and written some of the best action movies of the last couple years, so this off the mark pedestrian movie is uncharacteristic for him.

This is director Sylvain White’s first big budget action film and it showed in some of the more uncreative aspects of the film. Though one would expect experienced producer Joel Silver to offer the audience more than recycled plot clichés and somewhat forced humor.

“The Losers” was hoping to sneak in and steal the box office before all the summer blockbusters start. It will accomplish one of those goals by sneaking in the theater; however, it is destined to sneak back out just as quietly.

Imagine a contestant on “American Idol” ready to belt out their final big note, but instead of a show-stopping moment, they miss the mark completely and the room is left feeling awkward and full of pity. That’s what the theater felt like when the end credits rolled on “The Losers.”

Based on the comic book by Andy Diggle, “The Losers” follows a team of special ops soldiers who were double crossed and left for dead as they attempt to seek revenge from the mysterious Max.

If this premise sounds like the plot to the upcoming “A-Team” movie, it’s apparently just a coincidence. Of course, that hasn’t stopped constant comparisons. It even led to Warner Bros. changing the film’s release date in order to avoid cluttering the marketplace.

However, it’s not competition from a more anticipated film that sinks “The Losers” it’s the averageness of the film which makes it forgettable. It’s a very generic action movie that features a requisite amount of explosions and gun battles but lacks anything below the surface.

While the cast does have fantastic chemistry, it’s never a good sign when the audience is thinking about the cast’s upcoming films more than the one currently playing.

Jeffrey Dean Morgan (“Watchmen”) plays Clay, the team leader who is wracked with guilt over the team’s predicament. He soon finds their fortunes turning when he is approached by the mysterious and volatile Aisha, portrayed by “Avatar” star Zoe Saldana.

Their first meeting culminates in a sexy and fierce fighting scene early in the film which gives the audience hope for an out of the box action movie.

Unfortunately, that is the last ground breaking scene in the movie, as every other alleged surprise twist is neither a surprise nor a twist.

Idris Elba plays the gruff, uncompromising Roque and while Elba is a talented actor, he is woefully miscast in this part.

The movie’s only saving grace is Chris Evans and Columbus Short as Jensen and Pooch. Their comedic talents livened up an otherwise dull moviegoing experience.

Evans was recently announced as the new Captain America and anyone who doubts his casting will be reformed by his performance here.

Jason Patric portrays Max like a Bond villain in training, walking a fine line between caricature and over the top mess.

The disappointment in this film begins with the script, which was written by Peter Berg (“Hancock”) and James Vanderbilt (“The Rundown”). Berg has directed and written some of the best action movies of the last couple years, so this off the mark pedestrian movie is uncharacteristic for him.

This is director Sylvain White’s first big budget action film and it showed in some of the more uncreative aspects of the film. Though one would expect experienced producer Joel Silver to offer the audience more than recycled plot clichés and somewhat forced humor.

“The Losers” was hoping to sneak in and steal the box office before all the summer blockbusters start. It will accomplish one of those goals by sneaking in the theater; however, it is destined to sneak back out just as quietly.

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