‘Sound and Fury’ Album Review

By Angel Peña

Country rebel Sturgill Simpson takes an unexpected turn in his 4th album release. “Sound and Fury” is an album that fans did not know they needed.

When artists decide to reimagine their sound it usually ends in a complete disaster. However with Sturgill Simpson’s album “Sound and Fury” it is the complete opposite.

Instead of revamping his sound and having it flop on the charts, Simpson followed his instinct and cultivated a sound that transcends decades and speaks volumes about his ability to make music.

Simpson and company start out the album with a moody instrumental in “Ronin” that bleeds seamlessly into track two “Remember to breathe.” With guitar riffs and sounds inspired by ZZ Top and Black Sabbath, Sturgill brings together his early music influences to create a punchy bass driven track in “Sing Along” that really gets the album going creating a form of boogie rock that really gets the listener moving.

Intertwined with grungy vocals and upbeat bass lines of the album lies a track with an intro that seems to be straight out of Metallicas playbook. 

With an intro that comes in at two minutes and eight seconds “Make art not friends” takes you through a slow melodic build up that leads you straight to Sturgills calming yet rugged voice talking about how life goes on and that he’s better off alone making music instead of friends.

Fast forward to track nine, “Mercury in retrograde,” is an upbeat callout to journalists and media who try to be friendly to get interviews but not being genuine. “Mercury must be in retrograde again but at least it’s not just hangin’ around, pretendin’ to be my friend,” sings Simpson.

After winning a grammy for best country music album in 2017, he did not have prove himself in that genre anymore. Simpsons took his early music influences along with the influences of his band members and created something that is genuine to not only himself but everyone who worked on the album.

Paired with the albums release, Simpson got together with Japanese director Jumpei Mizusaki to create a Netflix animated dystopian film with “Sound and Fury” as the films soundtrack. The perfect pair gives the listener a moody animated visual to go along with the already deep and complex emotions of the album.



Country rebel Sturgill Simpson takes an unexpected turn in his fourth album release. “Sound and Fury” is an album that fans did not know they needed.

When artists decide to re-imagine their sound it usually ends in a complete disaster. However with Sturgill Simpson’s album “Sound and Fury” it is the complete opposite.

Instead of revamping his sound and having it flop on the charts, Simpson followed his instinct and cultivated a sound that transcends decades and speaks volumes about his ability to make music.

Simpson and company start out the album with a moody instrumental in “Ronin” that bleeds seamlessly into track two “Remember to breathe.” With guitar riffs and sounds inspired by ZZ Top and Black Sabbath, Sturgill brings together his early music influences to create a punchy bass driven track in “Sing Along” that really gets the album going creating a form of boogie rock that really gets the listener moving.

Intertwined with grungy vocals and upbeat bass lines of the album lies a track with an intro that seems to be straight out of Metallica’s playbook. 

With an intro that comes in at two minutes and eight seconds “Make Art Not Friends” takes you through a slow melodic build up that leads you straight to Sturgill’s calming yet rugged voice talking about how life goes on and that he’s better off alone making music instead of friends.

Fast forward to track nine, “Mercury in Retrograde” is an upbeat callout to journalists and media who try to be friendly to get interviews but not being genuine. “Mercury must be in retrograde again but at least it’s not just hangin’ around, pretendin’ to be my friend,” sings Simpson.

After winning a grammy for best country music album in 2017, he did not have to prove himself in that genre anymore. Simpson took his early music influences along with the influences of his band members and created something that is genuine to not only himself but everyone who worked on the album.

Paired with the album’s release, Simpson got together with Japanese director Jumpei Mizusaki to create a Netflix animated dystopian film with “Sound and Fury” as the films soundtrack. The perfect pair gives the listener a moody animated visual to go along with the already deep and complex emotions of the album.

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