‘The Marshall Mathers II’ drops and impresses

RAFAEAL RIOS | STAFF WRITER

Image Courtesy of: PR Newsfotos

Image Courtesy of: PR Newsfotos

Showing priority too “The Marshall Mathers LP 2,” Eminem proves us right. After releasing the singles “Berzerk” and “Survival” it was safe to imagine the direction Eminem was headed in “The Marshall Mathers LP 2.”

Perhaps it being the sequel to what many consider to be one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time “The Marshall Mathers LP,” Eminem felt he had certain expectation to meet.

“The Marshall Mather LP” has sold more than 21 million copies worldwide since its release in 2000.

According to Billboard, “The Marshall Mathers LP 2” is on its way to earning the second-largest sales week of the year, selling from 700,000 to 750,000 copies its first week.

With a great display of grit, Eminem does well in telling a side of the story we hadn’t heard yet.

In “The Marshall Mathers LP” the song “Kill You” talks about the relationship with his mother (“My momma use to tell me these crazy things”) (“then I got a little bit older and realized she was the crazy one.”)

In 2002 his single, “Cleanin’ Out My Closet” he continually bashes on his mother Kim Mathers actions, (“keep telling yourself that you was a mom!”)(“How dare you take what you didn’t help me get”)

I guess we can say Eminem letting his anger out in previous albums worked well for him, financially and emotionally so it’s no wonder that he approaches this album the same way.

In “Headlights”(2013) Eminem shows feelings toward his mother we hadn’t seen before with lyrics like:

“So Mom, please accept this as a tribute I wrote this on the jet, I guess I just had to get it off my chest.”

“I hope you get this message that I’ll always love you from afar, cause you’re my mama…”

Apart from all the anger ballads, Eminem has continued what he is great at, which is displaying a sense of deep emotion in his lyrics.

“The Marshall Mathers LP 2” speaks a story of how Eminem got where he is and what kind of rapper he considers himself to be.

“I’m beginning to feel like a rap god (rap god)/ All the people from the front to the back, nod (back nod)” but is this ego or truth speaking?

I guess the fans positive reaction to the single answers that, as he is one of the most recognizable rap icons alive.

From apologies to the occasional bashing, Eminem hasn’t sounded so focused since the early stages of his career.

To all the fans that in previous albums commented that the 40-year-old rapper was washed up, take a listen to “The Marshall Mathers LP 2” you’ll be surprised by your own reaction.