The litter challenge: Have you done your part for the world?

Zachary Ingram | Staff Writer

 

You along with every one of your peers is guilty of a capital crime.

Yes you, guilty.

Guilty, hands down, at 12 to zero.

You can try to find yourself the best lawyer money can buy, but there is no defense in the world that can prove your innocence.

Don’t act coy, you know what grand felony you have committed; you are a murderer of planet Earth.

A contract killer hired by peer pressure and society.

Maybe I could be wrong, maybe my eyes have played a cruel trick on me to fool them into believing that the students of Riverside City College don’t
believe in a clean campus.

No, that must be it: someone couldn’t just walk by trash and abandon it, leaving it there to sit lonely on the side of the path.

In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Dixon University Center is spearheading the change for a cleaner generation by cutting unlimited printing accessibility
down to a limit of 600 pages until a charge will be enforced.

In Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University has begun to set it’s self apart of the rest of the collegiate world with it’s implication of using 30 recycled material and cutting consumption by 10 percent.

In New Rochelle, New York, Iona College initiated a new policy of a campus wide paper conservation effort to reduce and reuse their paper conception.

All three of these institutions all have something in common they are being part of the revolution.

What a simple concept, saving the precious and finite resource of life by making someone pay for paper.

Diwion’s selfless act caused an estimated $35,000 savings per year, and about 89 trees per year.

Imagine if we could do that as a campus, save 89 trees. We can’t even pick up the stray pieces of paper that flutter by as the wind blows and students scurry to their next class.

If you leave a weed in a lawn of green grass what are the odds that if left there, it will vanish?

The same principle with the weed can be applied to the stray paper. If left alone it will only inspire more of its own kind to join it.

You, along with most people, will find it more acceptable to leave the paper there after missing the game-winning shot.

We need to stop claiming ignorance.

Stop denying that the sky is blue, that the paint is white and that you have never stepped over litter.

So I challenge you. 

Be part of the change.

Print on both sides of the page, keep old used paper as scratch paper and only print the final copy.

You can be a gardener to our city by preventing the trash ‘weeds’ from ever finding their way as a common detail in our daily scenery.