Resource Center runs low on resources

VALERIE OSIER | STAFF WRITER

The Resource Center is running alarmingly low on supplies due to an influx this semester in the amount of students utilizing it’s services.

The Resource Center, run by Associated Students of Riverside City College, is a place where students who have paid their student fees can get free food and toiletries, no questions asked.

The center is especially intended for students who are in need.

The Resource Center relies on donations from clubs, organizations, and other places to keep its shelves filled, and currently, they are looking extremely bare.

“The reason we ran low, is because students heard about this and are coming on a daily basis, and we’re receiving a lot more traffic than we used to,” said ASRCC Vice President, Miguel Bagsit. “The food is running out faster than we thought. So right now, were looking into various
donors and organizations where we might possibly get more food, and different kinds of food.”

According to Bagsit, the food running low is a sign that the program is doing what it’s supposed to.

“I think that means that we’re really being successful with it, and I do think that we need a lot more donations and it needs to be
consistent, in order for us to keep this sustainable,” he said.

The Resource Center holds assorted non-perishable food and toiletry items including the following: canned goods, soups, canned vegetables, fruits, cup of noodles, sauces, cereal boxes, on the go type meals, dental care products, razors and tampons.

“What we noticed ran out the most was the cup of noodles, because that’s an on-the-go type thing,” said Bagsit. “Hopefully we can work with food banks to see if we can get more variety.”

According to Bagsit, ASRCC is planning to do another ICAN food drive to fill the shelves .

“We just filled this up a month ago,” said Bagsit, as he looked at the nearly bare shelves.

To get food from the center, all a student must do is show that they have paid their student fees.

No student must show a financial need for the food in  any way.

While this provides for privacy, it also opens the door for students to abuse the program.

“I think that there are certain students that take advantage of it that probably aren’t in need, but at the same time, who are we to say who is in need and who is not in need?” said Bagsit.

As a result of the low inventory, students can take only one item a day.

“Some students will come in, and they don’t have anything else to eat, and some of them will plan for coming here specifically for the day, so it’s been tough because we’ve been low,” said Bagsit.

RCC isn’t the first school to have this type of program, but it has proven to be one of the more successful. According to Bagsit, other schools are looking to implement a similar food pantry.

The Resource Center is now accepting non-perishable food and toiletry item donations.

Students, clubs, organizations, and anyone else is urged to bring donations to ASRCC’s office.