Teen shot by head watchmen

A 17-year-old boy was shot and killed in Stanford, Florida on Feb. 26.

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By Amanda Rougeaux / Opinions Editor

( Orange County Florida Jail)

By Amanda Rougeaux / Opinions Editor

A 17-year-old boy was shot and killed in Stanford, Florida on Feb. 26.

George Zimmerman was found standing over the body armed with a handgun.

Zimmerman, 28, is a self appointed neighborhood watch captain.

The killing of the boy, Trayvon Martin, has brought up many controversies all over the U.S.

Zimmerman said he shot in self defense, though when police arrived.

Martin was found with only an iced tea and a bag of Skittles next to him.

Many eyewitnesses also account that Martin was unarmed. Zimmerman had followed Martin for several minutes before the two had a violent altercation.

Some facts are clear in this case, others not so much. The facts we know are, Zimmerman followed Martin for several minutes before the shooting and had called the police prior to following and shooting Martin.

The police dispatcher was told about a suspicious looking character wearing a hood and later told Zimmerman to stay in his car until the police arrive, which Zimmerman disobeyed.

In the police tape, Zimmerman clearly states “he’s black” at least five times. Police who arrived on the scene later confirm that they might have missed a key element of racial profiling stated in the tape.

Martin and Zimmerman got into a violent altercation before the boy was shot.

Martin was on the phone with his unnamed girlfriend at the time who has told police that she heard Martin ask someone “why are you following me” and then a scuffle.

Many believe this was an act of racial profiling because of the peculiar facts and eyewitness accounts.

Others believe this to be an act of an insane man who wanted to be a hero.

Zimmerman has yet to be charged with a crime.

People have been raising questions and controversy about the Stanford police department and how they are handled this case.

On March 13, ABC news uncovered questionable police conduct in this case.

An ABC news article states “Zimmerman described Martin as suspicious because he was wearing a hooded sweatshirt and walking slowly in the rain, police later told residents at a town hall.”

This raises a question, why would someone with a hooded sweatshirt in the rain look suspicious?

Was it because he was a colored young boy holding candy and an iced tea with his hood up in the rain? Questions like these can only be answered by Zimmerman.

On March 28 an ABC News exclusive surfaced with new evidence.

A video of the night Martin was shot showing Zimmerman being escorted into the police station.

This is a relevant video because in an earlier article ABC said, “According to the police report, Zimmerman, who was armed with a handgun, was found bleeding from the nose and the back of the head, standing over Martin, who was unresponsive after being shot”.

In the surveillance video, Zimmerman has no signs of blood or bruising on him. This video has brought up new controversy about Zimmerman’s original “self-defense” statement.

Honestly, the facts in this case do not add up. Zimmerman was never drug or alcohol tested the night of the murder. Police just ‘accepted’ his self-defense statement without further testing.

Although another reason Zimmerman has not been charged could be because of the “stand-your-ground” law in Florida.

The law is supposed to protect a person who has murdered by another because the person felt he or she was in imminent danger.

This law was not made for the purpose of this case.

People should see that Zimmerman put himself in an uncontrollable situation by following Martin. Should the “stand-your-ground” law apply if the person it is protecting made so many crucial mistakes as a watchman and citizen? This defense has its boundaries. When you have made someone feel so threatened by following them that the person has to ask why you are in pursuit, it seems that the law should be void.

If a person feels threatened ,the fight or flight mechanism turns on in the brain causing impulse and adrenaline.

Obviously, Martin tried to fight but why? Did Zimmerman start the altercation after being asked why he was following Martin, or did Martin start the altercation because he felt threatened?

This case continues to be an open controversy and will continue to be until justice is served found.

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