A fight the world wants to see

An arrogant and spry Floyd Mayweather stands victorious after a much anticipated, (but not the most anticipated), bout vs. Shane Mosley on May 1.

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By Daniel Torres / Asst. Sports Editor

By Daniel Torres / Asst. Sports Editor

An arrogant and spry Floyd Mayweather stands victorious after a much anticipated, (but not the most anticipated), bout vs. Shane Mosley on May 1.

After an exciting second round, in which the hard-hitting Mosley landed a few solid right hands to Mayweather, Mosley was shown for what he unfortunately is now, a feeble veteran way past his prime.

Mayweather took Mosley apart with quick hands and a defensive just-back-away style of fight.

The same kind of fight boxing fans have become accustomed to while watching Mayweather.

His flight-not-fight approach has become known as a massive letdown to the millions of fans who have rendered Mayweather the pay-per-view king in terms of numbers.

Mayweather, 33, in defeating the 38-year-old Mosley brazenly declared himself the face of boxing.

What the narcissistic Mayweather failed to realize is that he doesn’t choose what face people want to see when they hear the term boxing.

That’s because the people don’t see Mayweather as the face of boxing.

Most people pay to watch his fights for the sole reason of seeing him lose.

His pompous behavior only makes fans more eager to see him hit the mat hard, in what would be a joyous defeat.

The people’s champ, the true face of boxing in this era is a native of the Philippines.

The five foot six inch Manny Pacquiao has won the adulation of the boxing world.

His deft hands and no-nonsense, lets-duke-it-out approach has earned him titles in several different weight divisions.

His ability to defeat fighters ranging from the light flyweight division to knocking out “Golden Boy” Oscar De La Hoya in a welterweight bout has certainly caught the world’s attention.

While Mayweather was making of mockery out of Mosley, Pacquiao was on the other side of the globe fighting a different battle, a battle that won’t show up on any fight record.

Pacquiao was fighting his way into congress, a fight that was well earned, a fight that wouldn’t be lost again. Pacquiao once lost the election race, it was a race in which people saw an unknown fighter trying to make a difference in his community.

Pacquiao, now the most prominent figure in his home country, was victorious in his own crusade to help the struggling people of General Santos City, as well as the rest of the Philippines.

In his People’s Champ Movement campaign, Pacquiao tries to relate with the people in which he grew up with.

Cynthia Leandres, a health care worker said in an interview with Fanhouse.com, “There is a feeling that Pacquiao is one of us, one of the people, so we want to choose the right candidate to help us and that’s Manny.”

This kind of affinity shown to a boxer by the people of his country shows the admiration and humility of Pacquiao.

Just like Julio Cesar Chavez was revered in Mexico, Pacquiao is in Southeast Asia.

Although Pacquiao is now a congressman in his home country, plans to stay in the ring are ongoing, maybe even as soon as November.

A November fight which could match him up against the notorious Mayweather.

This “dream match” between Pacquiao and Mayweather is today’s Ali vs. Fraizer.

The battle of what can be called good vs. evil, as a humbling Pacquiao tries to hand the devious Mayweather his first ever loss that should definitely shut him up on his I’m-the-greatest-ever talk, or probably not.

This battle of welter-weight giants could have taken place back in March, but due to disagreements on drug testing the fight was canceled and Pacquiao went on to take down Joshua Clottey, a tenuous fighter who never stood a chance.

Mayweather adamantly requested that Pacquiao be tested using the Olympic-style drug testing, in which the boxer would be required to give blood samples up to the day of the fight.

Pacquiao, a very superstitious person in his own right, refused, saying the taking of blood from his body weakens him and he refuses to fight if not 100 percent.

Pacquiao is open to full urinary drug testing throughout and blood work for only up to 14 days before the fight and immediately following the fight.

Mayweather claims to want a clean boxing society, but is being looked at as someone trying to parry their first potential loss.

With today’s quick and detailed technology and Pacquiao’s willingness to give blood following the fight, there is no way that drug use would go undetected.

This just sounds like Mayweather, slowly moving past his prime, fears losing his undefeated image to today’s best pound-for-pound fighter in Pacquiao; a fighter clearly in his prime who has won his last 12 fights with eight of them coming by way of knockout.

Should the unprecedented happen and these two finally agree, the magnitude of this fight would only be augmented up to elite status.

This is the Kobe-LeBron in a game seven of the finals of the boxing world. The fight between good and evil, right and wrong, modest vs. egotistical.

For the sake of humanity, at least mine, lets hope it happens.

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