Homecoming 2008

Tigers football attempt to turn season around after losing three straight Southern California Central Division games Homecoming marks the opportunity for a college to create a stronger sense of pride in students. Other than the elusive State Championship Game, it is seen by the team as the most important game of any season.

No comments

By Jeff Sirko

Riverside’s Jacob Slouka attempts to catch a pass from Coy Glass deep in Cerritos’ territory, late in the fourth quarter, but can’t get a grip on the ball.

By Jeff Sirko

Tigers football attempt to turn season around after losing three straight Southern California Central Division games

Homecoming marks the opportunity for a college to create a stronger sense of pride in students. Other than the elusive State Championship Game, it is seen by the team as the most important game of any season. It isn’t about rank or stats, it’s about pride. The home team is seen as the defenders of the school’s name. For the opponent, no victory is sweeter than a win during the defenders homecoming.

Riverside City College Football took Wheelock Field Oct. 25 to the roaring applause of students and alumni. The Tigers would face Cerritos College with two clouds looming. The Tigers had lost five straight games eliminating any chance of making playoffs, and it was Homecoming. They hoped the 4 – 2 Falcons would be an easy target and the best opportunity to snap the losing streak.

However, the Tigers were still plagued by offensive miscues, defensive mismatches and questionable coaching decisions that had led to the worst record in over a decade. The Tigers fought hard, but it wasn’t enough and they lost to the Falcons 32 – 24.

The Tigers and Falcons put on an offensive shootout that would have fans on the edge of their seats for over two hours.

The game saw a total of seven touchdowns, two field goals and a two-point conversion. The Tigers and Falcons were neck and neck throughout the first half combining for 42 points.

The Tigers closed out the first half with a one yard touchdown run from Mark Tinahui. The Tigers would receive the opening kickoff of the second-half giving them their first chance to take the lead.

The Tigers struggled to capitalize on the opportunity as they did all second half. Riverside’s only successful drive in the second half came when Austin Glenn kicked a 41 yard field goal early in the fourth quarter.

Offensively, the Tigers were outmatched in every position. Riverside’s 259 yards in 69 plays was no match for the Falcon’s 387 yard performance. Quarterback Coy Glass was 15 of 28 for 135 passing yards, while Jeffrey Fischer of Cerritos, completed 19 of 22 for 191 yards. Glass struggled to complete big passes, often overthrowing the receiver. He threw two interceptions and was sacked twice for a loss of 15 yards.

The struggles continued for the Tiger’s backfield as the offensive line couldn’t contain the Cerritos defense. Riverside’s Anthon Spencer had nine carries for 62 yards and Tinahui contributed 54 yards in 20 carries.

The Falcons had great success moving the ball as stand-out Tylik Carter had more yards than the Tiger’s backfield combined, rushing for 129 yards in just 14 carries.

The one offensive bright spot for the Tigers was converting five of seven fourth downs.

Both Riverside and Cerritos had a bad game defensively. Both defenses had difficulty containing the opposing offense. The Tiger’s defensive line has struggled all season with containment. The defensive line was responsible for only 14 of 65 tackles leaving the linebackers and safeties to pick up the slack.

“Our defense couldn’t stop there running back,” offensive lineman Matt Higgins said.

The defensive backs would shift forward hoping to contain the run game only to have Cerritos go for the deep pass. “Not everybody was in sync,” James Calhoun said.

The Tigers are now 2 – 6, the team’s worst season in over a decade, and will wrap up the season at Wheelock Field Nov. 15 against Citrus College.

For students and alumni, the football game is the center piece of Homecoming, but not all that the tradition has to offer.

Tiger fans were treated to live music, a great halftime performance and a one of a kind tailgate party.

Fans arrived at Wheelock Field around 4:30 p.m. for an unusual tailgate party. Instead of the typical tailgate scene: burgers, hotdogs, and beer, the event had a formal banquet feel. Students and friends enjoyed catered mexican food as they watched live performances.

The Riverside City College Marching Tigers performed three songs that previewed their Beatles themed halftime show . There were also performances by the RCC Cheer and Dance Teams.

There were also two performance by Riverside City College’s Touring Dance Group. They performed a traditional African Dance as well as a Tango.

The tailgate party was a great preview for a well orchestrated halftime show. The Marching Tigers took the field to perform first with their renditions of Beatles classics.

The fans were also treated to performances by Riverside City College’s Choir Ensemble Group “Accafellas”

Even though the football team lost, fans showed a lot of pride in the team. The performers were commited to make it an exciting evening for students and alumni regardless of football team’s loss.

“I think homecoming is important because it shows a commitment to not only your school but the community that supports it,” Daniel Favella, Accafellas vocalist, said.

Homecoming isn’t just about putting on a show.” Favella said.

“A lot of people put a lot of effort, time, and money to entertain us the students,”

Homecoming brings out Tiger pride

Homecoming marks the opportunity for a college to create a stronger sense of pride in students. Other than the elusive State Championship Game, it is seen by the team as the most important game of any season. It isn’t about rank or stats, it’s about pride. The home team is seen as the defenders of the school’s name. For the opponent, no victory is sweeter than a win during the defenders homecoming.

Riverside City College Football took Wheelock Field Oct. 25 to the roaring applause of students and alumni. The Tigers would face Cerritos College with two clouds looming. The Tigers had lost five straight games eliminating any chance of making playoffs, and it was Homecoming. They hoped the 4 – 2 Falcons would be an easy target and the best opportunity to snap the losing streak.

However, the Tigers were still plagued by offensive miscues, defensive mismatches and questionable coaching decisions that had led to the worst record in over a decade. The Tigers fought hard, but it wasn’t enough and they lost to the Falcons 32 – 24.

The Tigers and Falcons put on an offensive shootout that would have fans on the edge of their seats for over two hours.

The game saw a total of seven touchdowns, two field goals and a two-point conversion. The Tigers and Falcons were neck and neck throughout the first half combining for 42 points.

The Tigers closed out the first half with a one yard touchdown run from Mark Tinahui. The Tigers would receive the opening kickoff of the second-half giving them their first chance to take the lead.

The Tigers struggled to capitalize on the opportunity as they did all second half. Riverside’s only successful drive in the second half came when Austin Glenn kicked a 41 yard field goal early in the fourth quarter.

Offensively, the Tigers were outmatched in every position. Riverside’s 259 yards in 69 plays was no match for the Falcon’s 387 yard performance. Quarterback Coy Glass was 15 of 28 for 135 passing yards, while Jeffrey Fischer of Cerritos, completed 19 of 22 for 191 yards. Glass struggled to complete big passes, often overthrowing the receiver. He threw two interceptions and was sacked twice for a loss of 15 yards.

The struggles continued for the Tiger’s backfield as the offensive line couldn’t contain the Cerritos defense. Riverside’s Anthon Spencer had nine carries for 62 yards and Tinahui contributed 54 yards in 20 carries.

The Falcons had great success m
oving the ball as stand-out Tylik Carter had more yards than the Tiger’s backfield combined, rushing for 129 yards in just 14 carries.

The one offensive bright spot for the Tigers was converting five of seven fourth downs.

Both Riverside and Cerritos had a bad game defensively. Both defenses had difficulty containing the opposing offense. The Tiger’s defensive line has struggled all season with containment. The defensive line was responsible for only 14 of 65 tackles leaving the linebackers and safeties to pick up the slack.

“Our defense couldn’t stop there running back,” offensive lineman Matt Higgins said.

The defensive backs would shift forward hoping to contain the run game only to have Cerritos go for the deep pass. “Not everybody was in sync,” James Calhoun said.

The Tigers are now 2 – 6, the team’s worst season in over a decade, and will wrap up the season at Wheelock Field Nov. 15 against Citrus College.

For students and alumni, the football game is the center piece of Homecoming, but not all that the tradition has to offer.

Tiger fans were treated to live music, a great halftime performance and a one of a kind tailgate party.

Fans arrived at Wheelock Field around 4:30 p.m. for an unusual tailgate party. Instead of the typical tailgate scene: burgers, hotdogs, and beer, the event had a formal banquet feel. Students and friends enjoyed catered mexican food as they watched live performances.

The Riverside City College Marching Tigers performed three songs that previewed their Beatles themed halftime show . There were also performances by the RCC Cheer and Dance Teams.

There were also two performance by Riverside City College’s Touring Dance Group. They performed a traditional African Dance as well as a Tango.

The tailgate party was a great preview for a well orchestrated halftime show. The Marching Tigers took the field to perform first with their renditions of Beatles classics.

The fans were also treated to performances by Riverside City College’s Choir Ensemble Group “Accafellas”

Even though the football team lost, fans showed a lot of pride in the team. The performers were commited to make it an exciting evening for students and alumni regardless of football team’s loss.

“I think homecoming is important because it shows a commitment to not only your school but the community that supports it,” Daniel Favella, Accafellas vocalist, said.

“Homecoming isn’t just about putting on a show.” Favella said. “A lot of people put a lot of effort, time, and money to entertain us the students.”

close

Stay informed with The Morning View.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox Sundays after each issue.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.