Progress continues

The A.G. Quadrangle is open…well almost. Classes resumed on Nov. 26 in the Quad after long delays and major upgrades. The long awaited re-opening has given a whole new life to students and faculty that have waited patiently. Interim President Linda Lacy, was especially pleased of the hard work by the Instructional Media Center and the facilities department who made the transition as smooth as possible by working on weekends and evenings to get the faculty moved into the Quad.

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By Aletheia Meloncon

With most classes from Lovekin Field now moved to the A.G. Paul Quadrangle students are adjusting to life in the new classrooms. (Justin Henderson)

By Aletheia Meloncon

The A.G. Quadrangle is open…well almost.

Classes resumed on Nov. 26 in the Quad after long delays and major upgrades. The long awaited re-opening has given a whole new life to students and faculty that have waited patiently.

Interim President Linda Lacy, was especially pleased of the hard work by the Instructional Media Center and the facilities department who made the transition as smooth as possible by working on weekends and evenings to get the faculty moved into the Quad.

“IMC and the Facilities department did a great deal of cleanup, making it possible to move in before the semester ended,” Lacy said.

Ralph Perez, director of facilities at RCCD revealed that part of their strategy was to get people in the Quad prior to the new semester to allow any issues to be addressed. The only minor issues that came up have been the need for more bookshelves and two phone lines not working.

“We have only had a couple of minor glitches since their-opening both of which have been resolved,” he said.

The departments who moved on Nov.16 have adjusted to the new space efficient and ecofriendly offices. Some of the offices are smaller than the previous ones, but many are happy with the new Quad.

“The office is smaller, but the move was nice and we are very pleased,” said Ilse Langeveld, English instructional department specialist.

According to Perez there are still some parts of the Quad that will not re-open until early next year, like the clock tower which should be fully functional in the spring semester.

According to Lacy there have been no complaints from students since the re-opening of the Quad. Many students forgot about the move and realized at the last minute that classes had been moved.

There was an information booth set-up in the middle of the Quad to direct students on where there new classes were. Ismael Davila of Outreach was in charge of helping the students find their new classrooms.

“We had lots of kids going to Lovekin Field and then coming here. Just about every student has asked where to go,” he said.

Students praised the new look of the classrooms right down to the chairs that have a more flexible back support.

“It felt like I was in college and not a 3rd grade portable,” Shyla Walker said.

Alison Davis, another RCC student, agreed that the new rooms were an improvement.

“It smells clean and new and the chairs are very comfortable.” she said.

Many students were asking where the new cafeteria was located. The Quad used to have the Tiger’s Den, a small cafeteria where students could eat and relax.

“We may move a trailer to be used as a food cart in the Quad much like the one that was in the Lovekin Field,” Lacy said.

Where the Tiger’s Den was located is now the basement location of some professors’ offices.

Not every department returned to the Quad. The photography department decided to stay in Lovekin Field. According to Nancy Gall, instructor of photography the wet lab in the basement is the best, but if they would have moved back to the Quad then the photography department would have to recreate everything they already have. Gall says that she’s happy where they’re at in Lovekin Field and wants the photography department to grow stronger.

“The space that the photography department previously occupied in the Quad will create much needed space for faculty offices,” Gall said.

According to Perez, most photography labs have gone to the dry lab, with digital technology and the wet lab is not used as much today.

“Photography chose to stay in the Lovekin Field. The new trend is going to dry labs, not wet labs,” Perez said. 

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