The Cancer causing pill

Today we are at a heightened state of awareness concerning medical issues, especially cancer. Advertisements, rallies, walk-a-thons, and general vendettas catch our attention and spark our questions. Even with all these advances in modern medicine, we still don’t know everything and anything new and unfamiliar may pose inherent risks.

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By Shaundra Palehgyi

By Shaundra Palehgyi

Today we are at a heightened state of awareness concerning medical issues, especially cancer.

Advertisements, rallies, walk-a-thons, and general vendettas catch our attention and spark our questions.

Even with all these advances in modern medicine, we still don’t know everything and anything new and unfamiliar may pose inherent risks.

In the 1960’s, along with the sexual revolution, came oral contraceptives and more commonly known as “The Pill.”

The pill has several benefits; however, the current debate is whether or not use of the pill increases women’s risk for different types of cancer.

Recent studies that have been made suggests something different.

It has been suggested that a cause of breast cancer could be the long exposure to high levels of estrogen; putting women who start their menstrual cycle early will start menopause late.

Women who have their first child after 30 years of age or who don’t have children are at a higher risk.

Breast tissue is directly influenced by estrogen. Since the pill is an artificial hormone (estrogen) booster, it seems natural that it may increase the risk of breast cancer.

On the other hand, most studies show that the pill decreases the risk of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is the trendy concern these days. It can be caused by human papilloma virus.

About ten years after discontinuing use of oral contraceptives, women will experience approximately the same level of risk of cancer as if they had never taken any at all.

Also, for white women who take the pill, the risk of liver cancer may be increased.

Then again, according to the “professionals,” all studies contradict one another.

This may be because the levels of hormones used have changed since oral contraceptives were first.

Perhaps it is because it takes up to ten years for breast cancer to even become visible.

Since the pill has only been around half a century, there hasn’t been enough time to accurately study the long terms effects.

The pill may increase the risk of cancer. And if it does, most doctors would say that the benefits far outweigh the risks anyway.

If you’re willing to take the risk, then you can do so at your own risk.

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